Tag Archives: Furniture

Poul-Kjærholm

Designer Spotlight: Poul Kjærholm

Poul Kjærholm was a Danish designer born in Øster Vrå, Denmark in January 8, 1929. His designs perfectly capture the elegance and clean line associated with modern functionalist furniture. His furniture is sleek and timeless, made with an eye for quality and craftsmanship. His career began in 1948 when he apprenticed for Gronbech as a cabinetmaker’s apprentice. At the end of his apprenticeship he decided to further his design education and enrolled in the Danish School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen. There he met his wife, Hanne Kjærholm, who went on to become a successful architect. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: George Nelson

George Nelson was an American industrial designer and one of the founders of American Modernism. Nelson was born in Hartford, Connecticut on May 29, 1908 and attended Hartford Public High School in 1924 before attending Yale University. He had no intention of becoming an architect until one day he was caught in a rainstorm on campus. He ran into the first building he passed which happened to be the school of architecture. Once inside he saw a student exhibition titled “A Cemetery Gateway” and decided to pursue architecture full time. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight On: Andrè Thuret

Andrè Thuret was one of the first modern French studio glass artists. Born in Paris on November 3, 1989 and raised in a traditional French “Bourgeoisie” family.  His parents set high standards for Thuret and he met them when he received a Law degree in 1920 followed by a degree in Science in 1923. Continue reading

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Style Files: Furniture Suites

Furniture suites can often conjure up horrific images of cheap college housing. Remember your first apartment that you rented already furbished? You probably had a black ceramic lamp with one missing bulb, a black aluminum table with a permanently dirty glass top and a set of Formica bedroom furniture that looked like it belonged in a mental institution. Right? It’s ok, we’ve all been there. Continue reading

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Style Files: Credenzas

Have you ever looked around your home and thought about your furniture? Really thought about the lines, the shapes, the style, the materials that each chair, each table, or each bed is made from? Furniture plays such an important part in our lives yet we rarely take a moment to look at the furniture we use everyday. The history of furniture is long and storied. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: André Arbus

André Arbus was a third generation French cabinetmaker from Toulouse. Born in 1903, Arbus worked in his family atelier and was trained in the same manner as 18th century masters Thomas Chippendale and George Hepplewhite.

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Style Files: New (Old) Antiques from AntiquitiesWeb

Now that the holidays are over and the in-laws are out of the guest room it’s time to sit back, relax, and treat yourself to some “me” time (and some “me” presents!) You’ve done your share of gift giving and now it’s time for some gift getting. Luckily AntiquitiesWeb has scoured the globe and come back with exciting new pieces to ring in the New Year with style. So keep your resolution to treat yourself right with a new beautiful antique from AntiquitiesWeb. Continue reading

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Style Files: Biedermeier Furniture

Biedermeier furniture was born from utilitarian principles in Germany during the years 1815 to 1848. Throughout the beginning of the Biedermeier period there was an emphasis on very little ornamentation and clean lines. As the period progressed the Biedermeier style moved away from Romantic-era rebellion and became increasingly ornate. The reason for the change in style was due to the rising middle class who was eager to show off their wealth with ornate, heavy furniture and classical design. Continue reading

Style Files: Art Nouveau

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Art Nouveau is a style of art, architecture, design, and decorative arts that was most popular during 1890-1910. It was a reaction to the strict, stifling academic art favored in the 19th century. Instead of harsh lines and industrial design, nature and the natural form inspired art nouveau. Its curved lines reference the natural curve of the human body. Art Nouveau was about blending in with nature while keeping a highly stylized design aesthetic—no easy feat. Continue reading