Tag Archives: France

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Designer Spotlight: Demetre Chiparus

Demétre Haralamb Chiparus (also known as Dumitry Chipārus) is a Romanian Art Deco era sculptor who lived and worked in Paris until his death. Chiparus was born September 16, 1886 in Dorohoi, Romania to Haralamb and Saveta Chiparus. When he was 23 Chiparus traveled to Italy where he studies under Italian sculptor Raffaello Romanelli. Three years later Chiparus traveled to Paris to attend the Ecole des Beaux Arts to pursue his artistic endeavors. While in Paris he studied under Antonin Mercie and Jean Boucher.

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Designer Spotlight On: Andrè Thuret

Andrè Thuret was one of the first modern French studio glass artists. Born in Paris on November 3, 1989 and raised in a traditional French “Bourgeoisie” family.  His parents set high standards for Thuret and he met them when he received a Law degree in 1920 followed by a degree in Science in 1923. Continue reading

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Style Files: Vanities

In 18th century France, “toilet tables” became a piece of furniture that every high born and bred lady desired. The “toilet tables” became what we know today as “vanities”. Ladies in France would put their makeup on and have their hair done at their “toilet tables”. Their cosmetics would be laid out on the table in preparation and when the ladies were finished they would wrap their cosmetics in small, square linens (known as toilettes) and bundle the makeup in the storage section of their vanities. The 18th century Restoration “toilet table” was ornate and gorgeous, featuring carvings and brass pulls and knobs. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: Émile Gallé

Émile Gallé was a French artist who worked primarily in glass and came to be known as one of the major artists during the French Art Nouveau movement. Gallé was born in Nancy, on May 8, 1846. He was the son of a faience and furniture maker and as a youth Gallé studied drawing, philosophy, and botany. He learned the art of glassmaking at Meisenthal and then worked at his father’s factory before launching his own career. He began by using clear glass decorated with enamel but soon developed his own style featuring heavy, opaque glass carved or etched with plant motifs. The natural motifs in his work would become extremely popular during the Art Nouveau movement. His later work featured elements like metallic foils and air bubbles and revitalized the glass industry by building a workshop that was able to mass reproduce his and other artists’ designs. Continue reading