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Style Files: History of the Desk

Did you know that the growth and spread of literacy in Europe created an entire new category of furniture? It wasn’t until the 17th century that the desk as we know it today was created. Before then, scribes would sit at sloped, rudimentary tables to make copies of books and manuscripts and documents. Those who were able to read and write before the 17th century were typically of the upper class and as such, they wanted refined furniture that would suit their needs—specific needs—for writing and reading. Thus, the desk was born. Continue reading

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Quick Pick of the Week: Singer Sewing Machine

This week we are highlighting one of our most unique and collectible antiquities: a Singer Sewing Machine from 1910. This machine is a piece of American manufacturing history and would make an amazing part of a collection for a pattern maker, tailor, or a Machine Age enthusiast. Our Singer sewing cabinet is in good condition and would make a beautiful addition to an Art Deco themed décor as well. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: Poul Kjærholm

Poul Kjærholm was a Danish designer born in Øster Vrå, Denmark in January 8, 1929. His designs perfectly capture the elegance and clean line associated with modern functionalist furniture. His furniture is sleek and timeless, made with an eye for quality and craftsmanship. His career began in 1948 when he apprenticed for Gronbech as a cabinetmaker’s apprentice. At the end of his apprenticeship he decided to further his design education and enrolled in the Danish School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen. There he met his wife, Hanne Kjærholm, who went on to become a successful architect. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: Demetre Chiparus

Demétre Haralamb Chiparus (also known as Dumitry Chipārus) is a Romanian Art Deco era sculptor who lived and worked in Paris until his death. Chiparus was born September 16, 1886 in Dorohoi, Romania to Haralamb and Saveta Chiparus. When he was 23 Chiparus traveled to Italy where he studies under Italian sculptor Raffaello Romanelli. Three years later Chiparus traveled to Paris to attend the Ecole des Beaux Arts to pursue his artistic endeavors. While in Paris he studied under Antonin Mercie and Jean Boucher.

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Style Files: The History of Upholstery

Have you ever sat down on a cool, silk cushioned chair on a hot summer day or snuggled up on a wool loveseat in the middle of the winter and said, “thank goodness for upholstery?” Ok, maybe not. But it is pretty fantastic that we no longer have to sit down on stone slab benches when we want to take a seat. Perhaps you’ve never actively thought about upholstery but think about it for a moment. Think about the intricate details of your favorite armchair or your family’s sofa. Have you ever wondered what it would look like underneath the fabric? There are layers of framework, webbing, springs, and hours of labor that went into providing you with that piece of furniture. The history of upholstery is as intricate as the process of upholstering. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: Jacques Adnet

Jacques Adnet was a French art deco modernist designer, interior designer and architect who was known for his incredible designs in leather. Born April 20, 1901 in Paris, Jacques Adnet knew from a young age that he was destined to design. As a child he often built tiny model furniture from found objects such as wood and fabric. Adnet attended the Municipal School of Design in Auxerre followed by the École des Beaux-Arts Paris. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight On: Malcah Zeldis

Malcah Zeldis (born Mildren Brightman) on September 22, 1931 is a Jewish American folk painter known for her work which features a mix of historical, biblical, and autobiographical themes. Zeldis was born in the Bronx, New York, and was raised in Detroit, Michigan in a Jewish ghetto. Her family was poor and often faced religious discrimination, which made it difficult for her father to find work. Eventually her family became financially stable and they moved to a middle-class neighborhood. Zeldis remembers her childhood as being filled with nature and she most fondly remembers her trips to the Detroit Institute of Arts where she would spend time lingering in front of the Flemish paintings of small figures. These works would inspire her art years later. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight: George Nelson

George Nelson was an American industrial designer and one of the founders of American Modernism. Nelson was born in Hartford, Connecticut on May 29, 1908 and attended Hartford Public High School in 1924 before attending Yale University. He had no intention of becoming an architect until one day he was caught in a rainstorm on campus. He ran into the first building he passed which happened to be the school of architecture. Once inside he saw a student exhibition titled “A Cemetery Gateway” and decided to pursue architecture full time. Continue reading

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Designer Spotlight On: Andrè Thuret

Andrè Thuret was one of the first modern French studio glass artists. Born in Paris on November 3, 1989 and raised in a traditional French “Bourgeoisie” family.  His parents set high standards for Thuret and he met them when he received a Law degree in 1920 followed by a degree in Science in 1923. Continue reading

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Style Files: Hood Ornaments

At AntiquitiesWeb we like to shake things up from time to time. Sure, we love settees and chaise lounges, but we also enjoy unique antiques and love to offer our clients a variety of vintage wares. Some of our latest finds are amazing antique hood ornaments. We found some great American made hood ornaments dating from 1941-1954, which we mounted on custom wood, stands for easy display. The ornaments are a timeless piece of automobile history and pure Americana. Continue reading